The bridge

Moving Henszey's Bridge


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The second move

The bridge was moved from the Greiner complex in Mount Joy on Monday, May 6, and lifted into place on the Central Penn campus the following day.

Mixmaster

The bridge en route to the Central Penn campus, passing through a highway interchange known locally as "the Mixmaster." This photo and the next were taken on Monday by Judith Redlawsk, a longtime pilot who is a board member at the college and teaches one course a year. Among other craft, she operates her own helicopter, which she used to track the bridge's progress from Greiner's facility to the campus.

Trucking

The bridge, on its gooseneck trailer, being backed past the former farmhouse that Todd Milano, Central Penn's president, rehabilitated for his office. The trailer's rear wheels can be steered independently from a small cab. The last couple of miles of the trip were the most difficult -- John Masterson, the project manager for Greiner, said it took three and a half hours to get the bridge into the Central Penn parking lot, a task that required the big cranes to be moved three times.

Parking lot

The bridge in the parking lot shortly after noon on Tuesday.

Interview

Todd Milano speaking before the cameras of local television stations.

Liftoff

The bridge was lifted off the parking lot soon after 12:30.

Flying

Two cranes navigated the bridge over the girders of its new approach.

Flying

Slipping the bridge between the two cranes was a delicate maneuver.

Flying

The cranes brought the bridge towards its new resting place.

Flying

The bridge was slowly lowered.

Landed

In place, at last.

Aerial view

Judy Redlawsk volunteered to take me up in her helicopter for an overhead shot. Note the extra-length trailer in the parking lot -- the bridge alone is 90 feet long and 14 feet wide (narrowed from 18).

Aerial view

Another shot from the helicopter gives a good sense of how big the cranes are.

Chopper

Ms. Redlawsk taking off from the field opposite President Milano's office. The helicopter has doors but she had left them at the airport because the weather looked good. The ride was a hoot.

View from campus

A view of the bridge from the older part of the Central Penn campus.

Another campus view

The bridge looks as good from underneath as from above. To judge by the camber rods, this is the side that faced upstream at Ontelaunee Creek -- and bore the brunt of damage during floods. The image at the top of the page shows the less-battered downstream camber rods before the bridge was moved.

The engineer who took over the project from the Bucknell students, Nick Demos of Clough, Harbour and Associates, said he suspected that the sag rods beneath the bridge (also called camber rods) were added at the same time that a center pier was constructed beneath the span (it was still in Slatington at the time, although a center pier was also initially present at the Ontelaunee Creek location).

The diagonal ties were probably also added then, he said, in effect converting the bridge from a simple arch to a truss. In calculating how much weight the bridge could be certified for, he said, he estimated its load-bearing ability both as a plain bowstring arch and as a truss with a curving top member. The bridge was sound either way.


End pieces

Throughout Tuesday afternoon, the field crew from Greiner kept busy securing the bridge in its new location. Handrails and decking are still to come.

arch



MAIN HENZSEY'S PAGE | BLACK AND WHITE | FIRST MOVE
SECOND MOVE | DEDICATION